The Normandy Landing.

On to Dieppe in Normandy in Northern France and the cliffs at Étretet. A stop at Le Mont-Saint-Michel on the way towards to Saint-Mère-Église for the 6th June.

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From Belgium Suzie and I moved on to Dieppe in Normandy, France.

After Belgium it was on towards Normandy in deteriorating weather. It was getting a lot cooler than it had been down South, in Austria and the Czech Republic for example. There the temperatures had been between the high twenties and low thirties in Celsius. Now it was down to the low twenties and occasionally into the teens with showers and ever increasing wind. I had ridden my Suzuki V-Strom 1000 Adventure bike from my home in Ireland, taken the ferry to France, and then on to Germany, Switzerland and Lichtenstein, through Austria and across Italy in the Alps to Slovenia, then spent a few days with friends in Austria. I visited Hungary and the Czech Republic, crossed Germany, and then visited Luxembourg and Belgium. I was now heading back through France, to be at a small town called Saint-Mère-Église, on the 6th June. I was stopping for a night or two in a small port city called Dieppe in Normandy. It is overlooked by an impressive looking, 15th century fortress, Château de Dieppe.

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The city was once a walled city and one of the five original gates to the city, known as Les Tourelles de Dieppe, has survived.

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Dieppe is quite pretty, but to a large extent it’s importance as a port and a seaside resort has all but disappeared, and while it does have a port side boulevard or promenade with a myriad of restaurants to choose from, it is probably not the most fashionable of places to holiday now. It is still an interesting and historic city to visit and is very popular with motorcyclists.

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It’s also still quite a busy port for the yachting fraternity and you could spend a considerable amount of time admiring the pleasure craft tied up in the marina.

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It is noticeable too, how many of the finer cars in life are to be seen in Dieppe. Apart from some Porsche and Ferrari examples that seemed to be there for some kind of event, that standard of car is certainly not out of place on the streets of Dieppe.

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I visited one of the great little restaurants situated along the promenade and while the language barrier did cause some problems, as neither of the two girls that were serving had any English, I had to use my very limited French and a bit of guess work to choose my order. I think you can see it didn’t work out too bad.

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A nice fresh fish dish with the fish wrapped in bacon. I didn’t do too bad in the dessert section either.

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No idea what it was but it tasted gorgeous. One of the girls chose a white wine for me that came in a carafe so I didn’t have the benefit of looking at the label. Whatever it was, it was light and dry and went very well with the food.

The next morning I rode up to Étretet, which is best know for it’s white chalk cliffs, and is very popular with tourists, and the beach and town were very busy. There were also lots of fine motorcycles and vintage cars to admire in the town.

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It was warm and sunny and the queue for ice cream was extensive as you can see. The streets of Étretet are full of beautiful old shops and buildings and there are no shortage of interesting restaurants and cafés to chose from.

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The beach is excellent with a great promenade from where there are many places where you can take steps down to the great looking beach. You can walk right up to the top of the white cliffs on either end of the beach as there are well worn paths to get you there.

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After Étretet I set out for a well known landmark. Le Mont-Saint-Michel, as you can see in the featured image, is one of the best known images of all attractions in this part of the world, and it’s well worth a visit. Nowadays you can’t actually drive up there as it’s always so packed with tourists. It’s well served with a large amount of car and coach parking and shuttle buses to bring you right up to Le Mont. I didn’t hang around too long though as the gathering rain clouds were an omen for my visit to Saint-Mère-Église for the final part of my visit to Normandy.

Author: Motorcycle Rambler

A motorcycle rambler with an interest in motorcycles and motorcycle adventures, food, travel, movies, photography and more.

9 thoughts on “The Normandy Landing.”

  1. It is so nice that you can visit so many different countries without too much difficulty. As opposed to us for example in the US. We can go to Canada, or we can go to Mexico. From where we live we can go to Mexico on a long weekend holiday. But, anything else takes lots of planning and time off work. I am looking forward to retirement when we can just keep riding south to the end. I love the feature photo of your post, the castle. Is it private, or can you visit it?

    Liked by 1 person

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