Suzie gets a facelift.

I eventually gave in and bought a GIVI Airflow.

I have been resisting an after-market screen for my V-Strom.

My Suzuki V-Strom Adventure 1000 brought me very comfortably around Europe in May and June and on my day trips and commutes recently and I have to say I was very happy with the comfort level. Someone had commented on a post of mine that I needed an after-market screen to increase comfort but I had resisted going for one. I felt that it would adversely affect the look of my V-Strom.

There are a number of reasons to consider an after-market screen to add to a motorcycle. It can decrease wind buffeting and also reduce noise. I felt that neither of these issues were particularly intrusive on the V-Strom and that I could do without changing the screen. Then I saw Norman’s GIVI Airflow on his V-Strom at a biking meet recently and I thought it looked good. He assured me it had made a marked difference to the comfort level so I was converted. Craig at the AMI & Overlanders shop in Gorey ordered a GIVI Airflow suitable for my V-Strom. When Craig called me to say it had arrived I rode in to the shop and Conor and I installed it in a matter of minutes. I am glad I was convinced to go for it because there is a noticeable reduction in noise and it has reduced buffeting, even if I didn’t think there was too much in the first place. The screen is easily adjustable and it only takes a few moments to change the height. I set it just below my eyeline and it works great. I don’t think it looks too bad either. The featured image was taken on the quay in Wexford. The image below is a little closer and I hope you will agree that it looks good on Suzie.

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Now is absolutely the time to enjoy it because the weather is glorious. Today it was reading a nice 24 degrees Celsius (75 Fahrenheit) with beautiful sunshine and blue skies. Yes, I know bad weather will test the effectiveness of the screen a lot more but hey, I’ll take the sunshine while it’s here.

The Normandy Landing.

On to Dieppe in Normandy in Northern France and the cliffs at Étretet. A stop at Le Mont-Saint-Michel on the way towards to Saint-Mère-Église for the 6th June.

From Belgium Suzie and I moved on to Dieppe in Normandy, France.

After Belgium it was on towards Normandy in deteriorating weather. It was getting a lot cooler than it had been down South, in Austria and the Czech Republic for example. There the temperatures had been between the high twenties and low thirties in Celsius. Now it was down to the low twenties and occasionally into the teens with showers and ever increasing wind. I had ridden my Suzuki V-Strom 1000 Adventure bike from my home in Ireland, taken the ferry to France, and then on to Germany, Switzerland and Lichtenstein, through Austria and across Italy in the Alps to Slovenia, then spent a few days with friends in Austria. I visited Hungary and the Czech Republic, crossed Germany, and then visited Luxembourg and Belgium. I was now heading back through France, to be at a small town called Saint-Mère-Église, on the 6th June. I was stopping for a night or two in a small port city called Dieppe in Normandy. It is overlooked by an impressive looking, 15th century fortress, Château de Dieppe.

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The city was once a walled city and one of the five original gates to the city, known as Les Tourelles de Dieppe, has survived.

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Dieppe is quite pretty, but to a large extent it’s importance as a port and a seaside resort has all but disappeared, and while it does have a port side boulevard or promenade with a myriad of restaurants to choose from, it is probably not the most fashionable of places to holiday now. It is still an interesting and historic city to visit and is very popular with motorcyclists.

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It’s also still quite a busy port for the yachting fraternity and you could spend a considerable amount of time admiring the pleasure craft tied up in the marina.

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It is noticeable too, how many of the finer cars in life are to be seen in Dieppe. Apart from some Porsche and Ferrari examples that seemed to be there for some kind of event, that standard of car is certainly not out of place on the streets of Dieppe.

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I visited one of the great little restaurants situated along the promenade and while the language barrier did cause some problems, as neither of the two girls that were serving had any English, I had to use my very limited French and a bit of guess work to choose my order. I think you can see it didn’t work out too bad.

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A nice fresh fish dish with the fish wrapped in bacon. I didn’t do too bad in the dessert section either.

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No idea what it was but it tasted gorgeous. One of the girls chose a white wine for me that came in a carafe so I didn’t have the benefit of looking at the label. Whatever it was, it was light and dry and went very well with the food.

The next morning I rode up to Étretet, which is best know for it’s white chalk cliffs, and is very popular with tourists, and the beach and town were very busy. There were also lots of fine motorcycles and vintage cars to admire in the town.

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It was warm and sunny and the queue for ice cream was extensive as you can see. The streets of Étretet are full of beautiful old shops and buildings and there are no shortage of interesting restaurants and cafés to chose from.

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The beach is excellent with a great promenade from where there are many places where you can take steps down to the great looking beach. You can walk right up to the top of the white cliffs on either end of the beach as there are well worn paths to get you there.

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After Étretet I set out for a well known landmark. Le Mont-Saint-Michel, as you can see in the featured image, is one of the best known images of all attractions in this part of the world, and it’s well worth a visit. Nowadays you can’t actually drive up there as it’s always so packed with tourists. It’s well served with a large amount of car and coach parking and shuttle buses to bring you right up to Le Mont. I didn’t hang around too long though as the gathering rain clouds were an omen for my visit to Saint-Mère-Église for the final part of my visit to Normandy.

Lunch in Luxembourg. Breakfast in Belgium.

Suzie has been so reliable and comfortable on this trip. We move on to Luxembourg city and then Namur in Belgium.

Suzie my Suzuki V-Strom Adventure 1000 takes another few countries in her stride.

It was time to move on from my cottage in the woods in Neunkirchen, Germany, so I packed my gear on my V-Strom and prepared to head into Luxembourg. I haven’t said much about my Suzuki V-Strom Adventure 1000 in my posts about this European trip. Why would I unless I was encountering problems? Apart from refilling the Scott oiler occasionally and a quick check over before another days riding, there was nothing to do but ride. This bike does what it’s supposed to do without a fuss. It’s a big comfortable bike that let’s you eat up the miles with ease. A fill of fuel for a little over twenty euros keeps you going for most days, about 400 kilometres. I found that was enough except for one or two days where I covered extra ground for a particular purpose. Of course if you drive it like you are on a race track you will have to pull in to fill more often. It’s well able for poor roads or even occasionally no roads, as I found when crossing into Hungary, where pools of water and rocky unpaved roads were the surprise order of the day. If you want to tackle canyons, rivers and mud pits, my advice is to buy a scrambler. Or a horse.  If you want the kitchen sink get a 113 cubic inch / 1800cc behemoth American tourer. Or a camper van. For most of what you’ll find on a regular motorcycle tour in Europe this bike is perfect and it doesn’t miss a beat. If I had to criticise it I would say that having come from a silky smooth inline four, I found that the throttle control is a bit “lumpy” at low speed but that’s not unusual for a two cylinder bike.  It’s an excellent all-round bike and I’m delighted to own it and I suspect I will get many kilometres or miles of reliable enjoyment with it.

Luxembourg is both a small country and very wealthy, busy and cosmopolitan city. A serious amount of damage could be done by a shopaholic with a flexible credit card in this city of wide DSC06837 (3)pedestrianised shopping streets. Every top designer brand I have heard of has an outlet close to the centre, and the city has a real air of wealth and history about it that I’m not going to dwell on. I parked Suzie in the shade  with a few companions, as you can see in the featured image, and went to explore. I had lunch under a shady umbrella watching the shoppers with their bags from top dollar designer outlets go by. While the temperatures were still relatively high, there were some ominous looking clouds in the sky. Clouds? I hadn’t seen much of those in recent weeks. At least the temperatures were back down in the twenties even if the humidity was still noticeable. After lunch, I left Luxembourg heading North towards Belgium, in light showers that weren’t going to cause any problems or discomfort.

Namur is a fantastic Belgian city with street dining and beautiful little squares full of cafés and restaurants. It’s most prominent building is a citadel, or fortress, that overlooks the convergence of two rivers that meet at the city. It’s well worth visiting and is a fine viewing point to see this interesting little city. I sat in a leafy square, DSC06903 (2)Place du Marché Aux Légumes, and ordered a glass of wine surrounded by what seemed like hundreds of university students from the university of Namur or the Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix, to give it it’s proper title. The tables were shoved so close together to make room for the big crowd that it was easy to talk to the people next to you. I spoke to some students of medicine and law sitting close by. A pretty young student called Roman, a student of medicine, advised me to go a little tapas restaurant in the next street. I took her advice and had a smashing meal in La Cantina, or rather sitting outside La Cantina, on Rue de la Halle. I strongly recommend it as the food was great.

Namur is well worth a visit. I choose it because it’s not one of those cities that you can take a cheap and cheerful flight to, for a weekend away. When you travel by bike you can stray off the beaten path. DSC07001 (2)It’s got everything. A very cosmopolitan and vibrant feel with interesting and historic places to visit such as the magnificent citadel and beautiful churches, one of which, the renowned Saint Aubin’s Cathedral, has many pieces of art, extraordinary bells, and a belfry dating back to the 12th century. DSC07004 (2)Amazing, considering how badly damaged the city was during both world wars. It is a shopping city of considerable note even if not at the standard of Luxembourg. Sunday morning is market day and many of the streets are full of stalls selling everything from books to clothes and anything else you can imagine. Try to experience Namur yourself if you ever get the opportunity.

Next for Suzie and I will be to continue our journey, from Belgium into France, and up to the coast at the historic and interesting port city of Dieppe, on the English channel at the Eastern end of the Normandy coast.

A Little Star of a Village in Wicklow.

Mrs Rambler and I visit Grangecon, with some friends. A little village with a big heart.

Grangecon is a little village with a big heart.

Wicklow is a great county for scenery and mountain walks just south of Dublin city. It’s top notch tooSONY DSC for scenic roads and tracks for motorcycle adventures. We discovered a gem of a village, with a population of about 200 recently when Mrs. Rambler booked us and friends into Moore’s oSONY DSCf Grangecon. Grangecon (Irish: Gráinseach Choinn / meaning Granary of the Hound), is just a couple of miles from Baltinglass. Moore’s is a traditional old time pub and grocery store and also a Tapas Restaurant with accommodation. It’s a very old business that’s been in the Moore family for generations. When we arrived we inspected our accommodation and it was two perfect  little offerings in the courtyard of the restaurant. They were quaintly painted up and sign written to be a post office and a shop. Both were equally well laid out inside with a double and single bed, en-suite bathroom and all the nice little touches that make the difference.

We ventured out on the street and the street was very busy. I don’t think we have seen so many sandwiches, currant buns and large vats of tea in one place for a very long time. There was a SONY DSCtractor run taking place and there was much excitement involved in the proceedings. I don’t know if tractor runs are a uniquely Irish thing but they seem to be very popular here. Young children in particular seemed to love it, some sporting their favourite tractor manufacturers peaked hats and overalls. There were people gathered around the sandwiches and tea emporium, which was a few tables set out close to one another on the street, with the ladies of the tea and sandwich committee making sure nobody was hungry. There were also some people blowing the froth of a few cold ones in the seating area outside the front of Moore’s. SONY DSCYes, I know it’s April in Ireland but it was a warm day and it looked comfortable there. We left Grangecon and headed off into the Wicklow hills for a walk out in the fresh mountain air to work up an appetite. The choice of places to visit is endless in Wicklow. Lugnaquilla, the highest peak in Leinster is not far away, Laragh,  Sally gap and Glendalough are a bit over the hill. Stately homes such as Russborough House and Avondale House are close. There are too many attractions to list. After a walk in the hills we paid a quick visit to Baltinglass.

When we got back to Grangecon, the party was in full swing. The intrepid tractor drivers and their groupies were ensconced in position, holding up the bar in Moore’s, discussing the merits SONY DSCof tractors, vintage and new. Horses, winners and losers at recent races were also a topic being mulled over. There was a great deal of discussion relating to mysterious farm equipment and tractor diff-locks, whatever they are. One guy was giving a full blown commentary on a race he had seen. He was holding his binoculars, which were actually two empty pint glasses, to his eyes, following the action on the track and informing his audience of the progress of the runners and riders. Another guy was pretending to be one of the more successful steeds and was galloping in front of the man with the binoculars. There was a man SONY DSC“playing the spoons” and we also spied an old metal drinks tray that we were told doubled as a bodhrán, a drum to beat. The make-shift band is apparently referred to as “Christy and the Quare Ones” in jest, or so we were told. A couple of girls were telling us of their mishaps that day. One had driven a truck containing horses to an event in a neighbouring county and on the way back had been told of a complaint of her driving. “Sure the size of the thing on them country roads”. Her friend told us of her mishap with a Honda 70 or 90. She had got a spin on it and managed to wheelie it into a garden hedge, with a passenger in tow, I think. Anyway, it was all exceptionally good humoured and everyone chatted away to us as if we were long time friends. Salt of the earth people who loved any excuse to get together and have a party and a chat with old friends or new.

The food we had in the Casa Tapas Restaurant was fantastic even if my companions didn’t share my conviction that we should get one of everything on the menu. It was probablySONY DSC a good thing because there was a lot of food, of the very tasty variety, in what was brought out to us. Calamari, pulled pork, sweet potato fries, chicken wings, patatas bravas and prawn dishes, to give you an idea of what we did sample. SONY DSCThe Desserts on offer were top class too. The breakfast the next morning was very tasty and there was plenty of it. I’d advise anyone who finds their mouth watering at the food, as well as the location, to book early. Apparently they are often booked out many weekends in advance. As well as the obvious reasons that I have described, the proximity of Rathsallagh, which is a popular golf  and wedding venue, means that it is not always available. If you get a booking and go there I think that you will find that Paul and Karen  are great hosts, and like me you will definitely want to pay compliments to the Chef.