Suzie gets a facelift.

I eventually gave in and bought a GIVI Airflow.

I have been resisting an after-market screen for my V-Strom.

My Suzuki V-Strom Adventure 1000 brought me very comfortably around Europe in May and June and on my day trips and commutes recently and I have to say I was very happy with the comfort level. Someone had commented on a post of mine that I needed an after-market screen to increase comfort but I had resisted going for one. I felt that it would adversely affect the look of my V-Strom.

There are a number of reasons to consider an after-market screen to add to a motorcycle. It can decrease wind buffeting and also reduce noise. I felt that neither of these issues were particularly intrusive on the V-Strom and that I could do without changing the screen. Then I saw Norman’s GIVI Airflow on his V-Strom at a biking meet recently and I thought it looked good. He assured me it had made a marked difference to the comfort level so I was converted. Craig at the AMI & Overlanders shop in Gorey ordered a GIVI Airflow suitable for my V-Strom. When Craig called me to say it had arrived I rode in to the shop and Conor and I installed it in a matter of minutes. I am glad I was convinced to go for it because there is a noticeable reduction in noise and it has reduced buffeting, even if I didn’t think there was too much in the first place. The screen is easily adjustable and it only takes a few moments to change the height. I set it just below my eyeline and it works great. I don’t think it looks too bad either. The featured image was taken on the quay in Wexford. The image below is a little closer and I hope you will agree that it looks good on Suzie.

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Now is absolutely the time to enjoy it because the weather is glorious. Today it was reading a nice 24 degrees Celsius (75 Fahrenheit) with beautiful sunshine and blue skies. Yes, I know bad weather will test the effectiveness of the screen a lot more but hey, I’ll take the sunshine while it’s here.

Surprised by Spring.

Spring has come but I am not able to get out on my Suzuki V-Strom Adventure.

Spring is here and the temperature is up, but…

It’s spring here in Ireland all of a sudden. You’re wondering why I am so surprised. Well, the seasons here only barely tip their hat at the date or time of the year. You can get full blown winter in June and fabulous sunshine in December. In this instance though, all the signs are there. Blue skies and lambs sunning themselves in the green fields. Ah, Spring is in the air and it’s bloody useless to me. I had surgery last week and I have to take it easy. No lifting or straining for a while. So that means no rambles on the motorcycle. My nearest and dearest don’t go for my argument that the motorcycle does all the work and I just sit there. The arguments are “you’ll burst the stitches and have to go through it all again”. Wouldn’t  you agree it’s so unfair to apply logic in an argument. How can I counter it? In the meantime the Suzuki V-Strom Adventure 1000cc that I bought from AMI in Gorey, for my own adventures is lying idle in the basement. No adventure motorcycling for me at the moment.

Sunshine and warmth on your back when you go outside. Normally it is what I am really looking forward to. I don’t allow winter to stop my biking but good weather is a pleasure. Today is warm, but not as warm as the weather station on the counter in our kitchen would have you believe. It’s not 35 degrees Celsius, even inside, but rather the warm sunlight is streaming in on the counter warming it up to give that high reading. It’s showing a 15 degrees Celsius outside temperature, and I would say that is fairly bang on, judging by the comfortable and relaxed demeanour of the lambs and their mums in my neighbour Bob’s field, as you can see in the photo. So, just as I am sitting here at the kitchen table, writing my post and contemplating my woes, I hear the distinctive sound of a Milwaukee V-twin burbling towards me on the road outside. I catch a glimpse of a beautiful sky blue Harley cruising by on our little road. “Little road” because there can’t be much more than a dozen houses up here on our hill. It can only be my neighbour who only just traded up to a black and red Harley last year, with this year’s new model, taking advantage of the nice sunshine today. Insult to injury comes to mind. Not that I begrudge him his new bike. Best of luck with it. Just that some of us are in here writing posts when we should be out riding…

So Suzie is just sitting in the basement, apparently oblivious to the arrival of SONY DSCSpring and doesn’t appear to be upset at all. And there was I thinking Suzie and I were going to be natural allies in this debate. Sitting there nonchalantly as if nothing was wrong. I even opened the basement door so the sun would warm her up a little. Nothing. No reaction what so ever. Just sitting there benignly as if there wasn’t a care in the world. I am just going to have to suck it up, I’m afraid and wait until I get the chance to go on fresh rambles in the near future. I have already set the wheels in motion in relation to planning a very big ramble that involves a ferry from Rosslare in the South-east corner of Ireland, and quite a few border crossings. Mostly the best kind. The ones with no customs posts or passport controls. There will be mountain roads and local roads and as much as is possible, little in the way of motorway or highway riding. More about that in future posts though. For now I have to content myself in scheming and crafting a plan to get out on the road with Suzie before Spring descends, in good old-fashioned Irish weather form, into dismal winter weather again. You know, the kind that might even last a whole day…

Suzie Stars in Dancing On Ice.

A scoot to Kilkenny, icy blast to Mount Leinster and a run to a bike show in Dublin before a date with a man with a scalpel.

About to suffer an absence from biking, I got out on the V-Strom in spite of very wet and cold weather.

I had a date with a scalpel wielding medic yesterday so, knowing there was going to be a period that I would not be able to take Suzie, my Suzuki V-Strom 1000 Adventure out to play, I took the opportunity to get out last week. My first destination on Thursday was  Gorey Business Park in Wexford, the South East of Ireland, to the guys in AMI (Adventure Motorcycles of Ireland). David had a few spare tickets for customers for the Carole Nash Motorbike and Scooter Show, in the RDS (Royal Dublin Society) Showgrounds, starting the next day, Friday. He kindly gave me my ticket and I had a coffee and a browse through the motorcycles on offer in the AMI shop, and as usual there were many fabulous examples to ogle.  After a chat with Derek, the Patriarch of the Ryanhart motorcycle dynasty, I headed off again on Suzie to Kilkenny.

One of my favourite short rides is to Kilkenny and a quick visit to Sullivan’s brewery Tap-rooom. I wrote about it in an earlier post about medieval Kilkenny (http://wp.me/p7IHqF-K2)sullivans and my feelings on their beer have been vindicated. There is a medal hanging on the beer taps indicating that the experts at the recent beer judging in the Alltech Dublin Craft Brews and Food Fair event, rated it very highly too. I ran into Ian, their Master Brewer while I was parking the V-Strom in the car-park at the rear of the premises. He is also an avid motorcyclist and we swapped a few war stories on our biking adventures abroad before I went in to order my pint of Sullivan’s Maltings Red Ale and Tikka Chicken Pizza. A pint and a pizza for 12 euros is good value in my book and the chef busied himself with their own wood-fired pizza oven making me a gorgeous crispy based offering. Ellen the bartender was kind enough to advise me to move Suzie into the covered area that is the walkway into the Tap-room to prevent it getting too wet. Which I gladly did because the rain was now teeming down. I had a  browse in their excellent wine and liquor shop at 15  John Street, before heading out on Suzie in the rain again.

A quick scoot to Borris, a small town in the general direction of home and I made the decisionninestones to go over Mount Leinster which had a little snow on it when I looked out my front door in the morning but I didn’t think that was going to be a problem. The rain was coming in heavy intermittent bursts but it wasn’t really an issue either. I made it up to the Nine Stones which is the viewing area at the bottom of the road to the Mount Leinster TV Transmitter mast or antenna, and took a snap with my phone showing a wet and misty County Carlow. I noticed that the gate to the TV mast road was open, which it almost never is, but knowing that the road is really only for RTE TV (national television broadcaster) personnel I wouldn’t be going up there. After all, it’s probably not allowed. And anyway there could still be ice and snow and the usual gale force wind so it would be dangerous up there. So, of course I set off up the road to the mast knowing there were a couple of places I could turn so as not to get to the icy, snowy and blowy bit. Which I duly ignored and got the full dancing on iceblast of the icy gale-force wind I was expecting when I rounded the last bend before the mast compound. Even so, it was hard to battle the wind, but at this stage you are totally committed, no turning back, with a nice covering of ice on the very steep narrow road and snow on the banks. The wind kind of picked me up and deposited me in the middle of the compound, wheels and boots sliding gracefully along in our version of “Dancing on Ice”. I think the judges would have been impressed. I was swiftly reminded why the RTE four-wheel drive vehicles have a little shelter built there to protect them from the large lumps of ice that fall off the mast and could easily damage a vehicle. It’s not a pleasant feeling thumping off a helmet either. I killed the motor briefly, and hanging on to the bike with my knees, I managed to retrieve my phone for another quick snap before the old adage: “discretion is the better part of valour” kicked in and I got out of there, rather gingerly.

The next day, Friday saw me heading off in nasty sideways rain. Real rain. If you get straight down rainDSC05578 in Ireland it’s not considered real rain. Straight down rain brings the comment “it’s a grand soft day” instead of a hard day with proper sideways rain. Straight down rain is kind of summer rain, but don’t let that fool you because summer is a moveable feast in Ireland that doesn’t follow any real seasonal occurrences or dates. I rode up to the RDS in Ballsbridge, Dublin for the Carole Nash Motorbike and Scooter show and luckily found a nice sheltered place to get the bike out of the nasty weather. The show itself was excellent. The AMI & Overlanders, Touratech Stand was one of the highlights and their customised black Africa Twin was a sight to behold. It’s theirs for the year for tours and demo rides and I hope I am back fully fit in time to get a jaunt on it before it goes on a holiday abroad. I am not sure DSC05599how to give you an idea of the scale of this event because it was way bigger than I imagined it was going to be. All the major manufacturers of bikes and suppliers of clothing and protective gear as well as many other organisations were present. There were lots of exhibitions too, custom bikes, vintage bikes and the myriad prizes, cups and medals, as well as the leathers of a certain Mr. Joey Dunlop. A Northern Ireland motorcycle legend, Joey Dunlop was voted the second greatest motorcycle icon ever by Motorcycle News, and many would argue should be considered number one. DSC05666Some living legends were called to the stage in the Main Hall and gave interesting accounts of their racing experiences too. Of course there was food and drink stands and at times when the rain eased off a little it was possible to go outside and see the stunt riders performing their skills in a fenced off paddock. I imagine it is more usual to see four legged steeds being lead around there because the RDS is most famous for equestrian events. I could have stayed ogling the bike beauties for days. All the best adventure bikes from Honda, Yamaha and many more as well as fabulous cruisers from Indian and BMW. Ducati, Yamaha, Harley, Suzuki, Triumph, Husqavarna, Royal Enfield and many more were also showing their fabulous wares. As well as the beautiful vintage Indian in the featured image, the modern “behemoth” Indian Roadmaster was spectacular, but all the manufacturers did themselves proud. Kudos to Carole Nash for a fine spectacle. And that was only Friday with two more days to go in what had to have been a brilliant weekend for all the motorcycle enthusiasts who attended over the weekend.

I met Colin, an old school friend, also a big bike fan, and we nattered away for about an hour and then it was time to gear up and head back out into the heavy traffic and sideways rain. It was a rotten dark, wet evening heading down the M11 on Suzie but it was worth it.  Now lying convalescing in my sick bed (read: being spoiled rotten with beverages and tasty bits) I know I will again be suffering some withdrawal symptoms (http://wp.me/p7IHqF-ST) and worse than the last time, because this time I have a bike in the basement but am just not allowed to use it for a few weeks, or maybe a week, or maybe… We’ll see.

Happiness is a girl called…Suzuki.

Getting in some trips on the new V-Strom 1000. Laurie loves the comfort…

The new V-Strom exceeding expectations.

My wife Laurie was not a fan of the seat on my Yamaha Fazer. It was a reliable bike and brought me on some long trips and back, safely without and issues, breakdowns or fuss. dsc05573-2When I decided to change, Laurie’s comfort was one of the highest priorities, and the V-Strom Adventure I got from the guys in AMI (Adventure Motorcyles of Ireland) to test ride, came first in her rating. It got an immediate thumbs up with a special reference to how comfortable the seat was. So, we picked the Suzuki V-Strom up, all shiny and new, in Gorey Business Park in the first week of January. To say the least, she is loving it. I think the number of miles we covered on it together has probably already exceeded the number covered on the Fazer.

Last weekend we did some nice miles, heading to Duncannon beach in Wexford, in the dsc05574South East corner of Ireland. It’s a lovely beach with great views of the Hook Pennisula and the Waterford coastline. It’s one of Laurie’s favourites, having spent all her childhood summers there. Duncannon has some great pubs and restaurants and we hookstopped on the beach, which is firm enough to drive on. The “Ta-Dah” moment in the featured photo is when Laurie found a suitable piece of driftwood to put under the side-stand so we could park up for a little while. We headed for the Hook which is another of our favourite stops. Hook Lighthouse is one of the oldest working lighthouses in the world. After a visit to the Lighthouse restaurant we were off again. Waterford City and The Copper Coast was next on our agenda.

We got new Scott jackets and pants along with Schubert helmets that are very comfortable and we are very happy with them. I am particularly happy with the communication system because I can’t hear a word she says. Probably down to my bad hearing. Perfect.

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Bike Warm.

It’s important to stay safe when your out on your motorcycle. This is what I wear.

What I wear biking in cold weather.

Someone asked me recently how I manage the cold weather on my bike. I think it was in response to a post I wrote where I mentioned that when I started out in the morning it was minus 2 degrees Celsius, which is fairly nippy. I think the reader comes from a warmer climate than ours here in Ireland and couldn’t contemplate getting on a motorcycle in that kind of temperature.  dsc05510So my advice is, just move somewhere warmer. I wish it could be so! For now I’m stuck here where, although it hasn’t been a cold winter by any means, we have had some frost and temperatures down at minus 4 and a little lower in some places. That’s not that cold, and I’m sure if your from a country with a much colder climate you are wondering what the fuss is. The reason I think it’s important to talk about temperature is that it’s my opinion that if you get too cold, you are a danger to yourself and others when your out on a motorbike. When you start to feel numb it’s an indicator that things aren’t right and before long your muscles start to become weak and you can even start to become sleepy or drowsy, which is never to be recommended, particularly on a motorcycle.

The fact is, I never knew how cold it was on my last bike, but the V-Strom has a digital air temperature read out, dsc05539as you can see in the picture above. Up to now if the fields were white with frost when I looked out, well then I knew it was frosty and I put on an extra layer. I am going to go in to detail and explain exactly what I wear. My preference is a base layer, my wife and I have merino wool long thermals and they are very good, dsc05566but there are plenty of sports base layers that are great too.  A t-shirt comes next or in very cold weather I would then put on a light fleece. Two pairs of merino wool socks, one of which is long, goes on next, and the long ones tuck nicely over the legs of the base layer. We both recently purchased ultra light feather and down jackets and they are brilliant. They roll up into tiny stuff pouches but are warm enough to wear as outer layers when your out and about walking, except in really cold weather. I am wearing one and holding another in the picture to show just how small they can pack and it’s amazing just how much warmth they create under your bike jacket.

We got new Scott suits when I bought the new bike and though we haven’t used the new gear much yet it’s already clear how snug and warm they are. dsc05559Double layered and Gore-tex lined. We are very used to rain in Ireland though, and I always pack a waterproof jacket and pants, because I have experienced “waterproof” clothing before. My wettest experience in years was a trip from Northern France, through Belgium and all the way up through the Netherlands to The Hague, to stay with my good friends Damir and Alisa. Hard to believe that an Irishman had his worst wetting in another country. I have some good heavy duty thermal gloves but the Hot Grips on the V-Strom mean that my hands are unlikely to be a problem. I have a few pairs of boots for use on the bike but my favourite ones are the Daytona Traveller boots that are warm and waterproof. My feet have never been wet and the wet trip to The Hague there was barely a drop even got past the zips into the first folded layer of Gore-tex material and absolutely not a drop got inside. My preference is for full face helmets for warmth and safety, though I did bring an open face one with me to the States last year for my trip with Matt up to Laconia Bike Week last year. I have fleece neck warmers and neck buffs and even buffs with a fleece section that does it all in one. The last thing to go on is the reflective jacket that is another layer against the cold and improves the rider’s visibility.

Kicking up dirt on the V-Strom 1000.

Muddy roads are not stopping the fun I’m having on the V-strom 1000 Adventure.

Roads are filthy but the bike rides are fun.

I am really enjoying my new scoot, the Suzuki V-Strom 1000 Adventure and getting out on it as much as possible. I have it three weeks now and am appreciating it more every time I get to ride it. It’s due it’s first service at 1000km and this morning whendsc05510 I rolled it out of the basement I knew it was gone over 1000km so it was time to head to AMI (Adventure Motorcycles of Ireland) in Gorey, County Wexford to see if the guys were able to fit in the service, which is essentially an oil and filter change. I think you should be able to read the dash, immediately under the 0 for speed. The reading was 001140 kilometres this morning before I set off. Thankfully Craig told me that it would be tomorrow morning before they can do it, which is great! I don’t even have to think up an excuse to go for a blast on the V-Strom again tomorrow morning.

So having been in AMI and enjoying a coffee there I decided to go visit a young man who is crazy about motorbikes and loves when his Grandfather comes to visit so he can get on one. My grandsondsc05525 is three months old today. Páidí was born on 31st October and today is 31st January, so it was only right and proper that I took the bike out to visit him and his Mum and Dad, and of course he insisted on taking a close look at the bike to make sure I am caring for it properly. I think it passed muster because the only comment he made was a few  approving gurgles and that was good enough for me. So after that seal of approval I headed back towards home and stopped in Nolan’s garage for the obligatory power wash. The roads are just filthy at this time of the year, caused by a combination of the very changeable weather and the increased agricultural activity because the farmers are ploughing every chance they get, and rightly so. The road surfaces are so muddy that the muck is kicking up even without going off road. It’s not too much of a chore to give the bike a blast of the washer anyway. dsc05528I am really enjoying the bike’s ability to sail along on all road surfaces, whether it’s wet or mucky. The bike seems to take it all in it’s stride and even the once or twice I’ve had it out when the low temperature warning was flashing, I felt very confident that all was well and traction was good. And doesn’t it look well when it is washed? It will be out in the morning again. Another spin back into Gorey and our friends in AMI and let’s hope they won’t be concerned that the 1000km service is going to be done at over 1200km, because we passed that figure on the digital read out on the way home from visiting Páidí.

Trip on the New Steed.

First long ride on my new bike.

Back in the basement after it’s first day out.

I took out my new bike today for it’s first long spin. Did about 450 kilometres (280 miles) from home to Cork and back. It was really enjoyable in spite of a few showers. The temperatures varied a bit but mainly between 7C and 9C (44F to 48F). There is going to be a lot of trips and information to share in the future about rambling on this great new scoot.