In the Summertime When the Weather is Hot.

Great weather in Ireland means biking. Hot weather in Clare brings on a need to visit the picturesque village of Doolin.

High temperatures in May in Ireland definitely means bike time.

It’s getting close to my big trip in Europe but the weather has been so warm and dry in Ireland DSC05705 (2)that it would be almost impossible to resist a little motorcycling. The Wicklow hills are in my back yard so myself and Mrs. Rambler did a trip to Powerscourt Waterfall. At 400 feet or 121 metres it’s quite impressive. It’s in a mountain valley near Enniskerry about half an hour South of Dublin. It’s a very popular place to visit and particularly when the weather is warm it gets a large number of visitors. We combined it with a visit to some of the quaint villages in the area. Roundwood, Laragh and Glendalough are only a short distance on the V-Strom and we did a quick spin up to Sally gap and Lake Tay which are only a stone’s throw away as well. There’s always something to see in the Wicklow area and lots of people come out to take advantage of it when the weather is good, and why not. We enjoy hill-walking a lot and Wicklow certainly has a lot of possibilities for outdoor pursuits.

Last Monday I was checking my favourite weather app and noticed it was indicating 23 degrees in Clare so I packed the tent and a few other bits and DSC05733 (2)pieces on to the V-Strom and that’s a fairly easy task as it came with panniers and I added a top box. The trip to Doolin in County Clare is about three and a half hours but I stopped a few times for fuel for the Suzuki and fuel in the form of coffee for me. I was delighted that the app was right in relation to temperatures. The readout on the dash showed a steady increase as I went West. By the time I hit Clare it was staying steady at 23 degrees Celsius. It even showed 24 degrees briefly with a blue sky and plenty of sunshine. I rocked up to O’Connor’s Riverside Camping and Caravan site about 4 pm in the evening and set up the tent. DSC05779 (2)I hadn’t done it for a while but I got it up without too much of a problem. I have stayed at this site before and it’s really smashing. The staff are friendly and helpful and I also noticed a new addition in the form of “glamping” yurts. I had never seen these in the flesh before and they definitely made my little tent look far away from glamorous. I couldn’t believe how luxurious they looked inside and had to take a picture to show Mrs. Rambler. If we get a chance later in the summer we might just give them a go.

I spent an hour or so exploring on the V-Strom. It’s only a few minutes to Doolin Pier where you can take a ferry ride to either the island or to view DSC05756 (2)the Cliffs of Moher. I visited some of the little towns nearby too. Lahinch and Lisdoonvarna are only short distances away. When I got back to the tent I parked up the bike and walked up to O’Connor’s pub which was always a great spot for food and music. By now I had built up a good appetite. I was relying on previous experience and was not disappointed. The food was as good as I had hoped. DSC05767 (2)It’s always a good place for seafood and the service is quick and efficient but I was obviously too early for music. Not too worry though because Doolin is a great place for traditional music and after a leisurely walk taking in the beautiful red sunset I visited some of the other pubs. They were all very busy and the music and poetry renditions were great. It is hard to believe that Doolin could be so busy this early in the year. It seemed like there were twice as many visitors from outside Ireland as from within the country. As is usual in these homely places with nice music and lots of visitors, everyone talks to everyone, and it’s a nice way to meet people and have a relaxing evening.

Back to reality the next morning. I realised why I don’t chose to stay in the tent too often. I was a little stiff to say the least of it. It’s nice to do it occasionally but I don’t think I’d like to be crawlingDSC05730 (2) into a tent for a few nights in a row. I folded away the tent and sleeping bag and packed up the bike. I decided to forgo the pleasure of cooking my own breakfast even though the kitchen facilities in the Riverside site are first rate. I stopped not far from Bunratty Castle and  enjoyed a hearty full Irish and then set off for home. It was a nice trip in brilliant weather but now its time to start getting ready for a longer bike adventure, further afield.

As I mentioned earlier, I am taking the ferry to France shortly so today I visited the AMI (Adventure Motorcycles Ireland) shop in Gorey to have someone else throw an eye on the V-Strom before the big adventure. Of course there was no sign of the lads. Gary, Craig and Derek are off working hard investigating routes for future tours or actually guiding a tour at the moment. David had just headed off somewhere before I arrived. It’s amazing how these guys always find somewhere urgent to go on their bikes to somewhere interesting and exotic, like Portugal or Greece or Morocco, where the weather is good. It’s hard work but someone has to do it. Which left Joanna and Conor minding the fort. Which they were doing admirably. Conor had a quick check on the bike and we adjusted a few things, all with a view to satisfying myself that everything was in order for the anticipated high mileage in the next few weeks that I am really looking forward to.

Suzie in the sunshine.

When it’s sunny in Ireland you have to get your bike out. The V-Strom was a joy to ride today.

Weather in the high teens means bike time in Ireland.

Today was a beauty so I decided to take the V-Strom out for a spin. I haven’t being biking lately because I’ve had to take it easy recently after a quick pit-stop in hospital for an oil change and service. It was an over-due bit of maintenance on me, rather than the motorcycle for a change, but I am well on the road to recovery. It’s like when you get new tyres you’ll be told to take it handy until they’re worn in a little bit. In Ireland if you see that yellow thing up in the sky, well then it’s time to get out and about and enjoy it because it could be back to dampness again without too much of a delay. Not to worry, it’ll change again before you get a chance to get accustomed to the new weather situation.

I met up with my brother-in-law, Declan who wanted to knock the cob-webs off his Triumph AmericaIMG_0162, a cool little cruiser, that has been well behaved since a few incidents I described in an earlier post (http://wp.me/p7IHqF-wo). Yes, it’s the same Triumph America that I “push started” more times than I care to remember in France a few years ago. All is forgiven now and Declan and I met up and went out to enjoy the sunshine. 18ºC is a positive heatwave in April in Ireland and it was not to be wasted. Since I’m not fully back to fitness,  and Joan the Weather Lady on the national TV channel had advised of the possibility of sea fog near the coast, we decided to go to one of myIMG_0160 nearest and dearest destinations, the little inland city of Kilkenny. It didn’t disappoint. Thronged with other people out enjoying the sunshine, it is always a pleasure to visit. The castle is a complete gem and definitely not to be missed on a sunny day. Already Kilkenny is bursting at the seams with visitors and tours from overseas. Rather than making it feel overcrowded, it gives Kilkenny that cosmopolitan air to it. It makes you feel you are where it’s all happening, in a relaxed sort of way. People are strolling around enjoying what there is to see or just chilling in the beautiful castle gardens.

One of my favourite spots to visit in Kilkenny is Sullivan’s Brewing Company where they have DSC05369their own beer and their own wood-fired pizzas. Declan and I had a gorgeous pizza each and a pint of their award winning Maltings Red Ale, sitting in the sun-trap that is their beer and pizza garden. That’s the good life for sure. We enjoyed that little piece of heaven, sitting in the sunshine, but reality intrudes and before long it was time to go about our business. We walked up High Street and I showed Declan a motorcycle shop up beside Rothe House in one of the laneways off High Street. Brodericks is run by Enda Carrigan. Enda was busy with a customer so we just checked out his stock of motorcycles and as usual he had a nice selection of bikes to look at. Shortly after that we parted ways and when I got home I was satisfied that I had got a spin on the V-Strom and it was as enjoyable as expected. I have to be fully fit for my big European trip on Suzie in May and it won’t be long now until I have to get all my gear onto the V-Strom for the first time. Maybe a little practice run might help. You’d never know.

 

Surprised by Spring.

Spring has come but I am not able to get out on my Suzuki V-Strom Adventure.

Spring is here and the temperature is up, but…

It’s spring here in Ireland all of a sudden. You’re wondering why I am so surprised. Well, the seasons here only barely tip their hat at the date or time of the year. You can get full blown winter in June and fabulous sunshine in December. In this instance though, all the signs are there. Blue skies and lambs sunning themselves in the green fields. Ah, Spring is in the air and it’s bloody useless to me. I had surgery last week and I have to take it easy. No lifting or straining for a while. So that means no rambles on the motorcycle. My nearest and dearest don’t go for my argument that the motorcycle does all the work and I just sit there. The arguments are “you’ll burst the stitches and have to go through it all again”. Wouldn’t  you agree it’s so unfair to apply logic in an argument. How can I counter it? In the meantime the Suzuki V-Strom Adventure 1000cc that I bought from AMI in Gorey, for my own adventures is lying idle in the basement. No adventure motorcycling for me at the moment.

Sunshine and warmth on your back when you go outside. Normally it is what I am really looking forward to. I don’t allow winter to stop my biking but good weather is a pleasure. Today is warm, but not as warm as the weather station on the counter in our kitchen would have you believe. It’s not 35 degrees Celsius, even inside, but rather the warm sunlight is streaming in on the counter warming it up to give that high reading. It’s showing a 15 degrees Celsius outside temperature, and I would say that is fairly bang on, judging by the comfortable and relaxed demeanour of the lambs and their mums in my neighbour Bob’s field, as you can see in the photo. So, just as I am sitting here at the kitchen table, writing my post and contemplating my woes, I hear the distinctive sound of a Milwaukee V-twin burbling towards me on the road outside. I catch a glimpse of a beautiful sky blue Harley cruising by on our little road. “Little road” because there can’t be much more than a dozen houses up here on our hill. It can only be my neighbour who only just traded up to a black and red Harley last year, with this year’s new model, taking advantage of the nice sunshine today. Insult to injury comes to mind. Not that I begrudge him his new bike. Best of luck with it. Just that some of us are in here writing posts when we should be out riding…

So Suzie is just sitting in the basement, apparently oblivious to the arrival of SONY DSCSpring and doesn’t appear to be upset at all. And there was I thinking Suzie and I were going to be natural allies in this debate. Sitting there nonchalantly as if nothing was wrong. I even opened the basement door so the sun would warm her up a little. Nothing. No reaction what so ever. Just sitting there benignly as if there wasn’t a care in the world. I am just going to have to suck it up, I’m afraid and wait until I get the chance to go on fresh rambles in the near future. I have already set the wheels in motion in relation to planning a very big ramble that involves a ferry from Rosslare in the South-east corner of Ireland, and quite a few border crossings. Mostly the best kind. The ones with no customs posts or passport controls. There will be mountain roads and local roads and as much as is possible, little in the way of motorway or highway riding. More about that in future posts though. For now I have to content myself in scheming and crafting a plan to get out on the road with Suzie before Spring descends, in good old-fashioned Irish weather form, into dismal winter weather again. You know, the kind that might even last a whole day…

Suzie Stars in Dancing On Ice.

A scoot to Kilkenny, icy blast to Mount Leinster and a run to a bike show in Dublin before a date with a man with a scalpel.

About to suffer an absence from biking, I got out on the V-Strom in spite of very wet and cold weather.

I had a date with a scalpel wielding medic yesterday so, knowing there was going to be a period that I would not be able to take Suzie, my Suzuki V-Strom 1000 Adventure out to play, I took the opportunity to get out last week. My first destination on Thursday was  Gorey Business Park in Wexford, the South East of Ireland, to the guys in AMI (Adventure Motorcycles of Ireland). David had a few spare tickets for customers for the Carole Nash Motorbike and Scooter Show, in the RDS (Royal Dublin Society) Showgrounds, starting the next day, Friday. He kindly gave me my ticket and I had a coffee and a browse through the motorcycles on offer in the AMI shop, and as usual there were many fabulous examples to ogle.  After a chat with Derek, the Patriarch of the Ryanhart motorcycle dynasty, I headed off again on Suzie to Kilkenny.

One of my favourite short rides is to Kilkenny and a quick visit to Sullivan’s brewery Tap-rooom. I wrote about it in an earlier post about medieval Kilkenny (http://wp.me/p7IHqF-K2)sullivans and my feelings on their beer have been vindicated. There is a medal hanging on the beer taps indicating that the experts at the recent beer judging in the Alltech Dublin Craft Brews and Food Fair event, rated it very highly too. I ran into Ian, their Master Brewer while I was parking the V-Strom in the car-park at the rear of the premises. He is also an avid motorcyclist and we swapped a few war stories on our biking adventures abroad before I went in to order my pint of Sullivan’s Maltings Red Ale and Tikka Chicken Pizza. A pint and a pizza for 12 euros is good value in my book and the chef busied himself with their own wood-fired pizza oven making me a gorgeous crispy based offering. Ellen the bartender was kind enough to advise me to move Suzie into the covered area that is the walkway into the Tap-room to prevent it getting too wet. Which I gladly did because the rain was now teeming down. I had a  browse in their excellent wine and liquor shop at 15  John Street, before heading out on Suzie in the rain again.

A quick scoot to Borris, a small town in the general direction of home and I made the decisionninestones to go over Mount Leinster which had a little snow on it when I looked out my front door in the morning but I didn’t think that was going to be a problem. The rain was coming in heavy intermittent bursts but it wasn’t really an issue either. I made it up to the Nine Stones which is the viewing area at the bottom of the road to the Mount Leinster TV Transmitter mast or antenna, and took a snap with my phone showing a wet and misty County Carlow. I noticed that the gate to the TV mast road was open, which it almost never is, but knowing that the road is really only for RTE TV (national television broadcaster) personnel I wouldn’t be going up there. After all, it’s probably not allowed. And anyway there could still be ice and snow and the usual gale force wind so it would be dangerous up there. So, of course I set off up the road to the mast knowing there were a couple of places I could turn so as not to get to the icy, snowy and blowy bit. Which I duly ignored and got the full dancing on iceblast of the icy gale-force wind I was expecting when I rounded the last bend before the mast compound. Even so, it was hard to battle the wind, but at this stage you are totally committed, no turning back, with a nice covering of ice on the very steep narrow road and snow on the banks. The wind kind of picked me up and deposited me in the middle of the compound, wheels and boots sliding gracefully along in our version of “Dancing on Ice”. I think the judges would have been impressed. I was swiftly reminded why the RTE four-wheel drive vehicles have a little shelter built there to protect them from the large lumps of ice that fall off the mast and could easily damage a vehicle. It’s not a pleasant feeling thumping off a helmet either. I killed the motor briefly, and hanging on to the bike with my knees, I managed to retrieve my phone for another quick snap before the old adage: “discretion is the better part of valour” kicked in and I got out of there, rather gingerly.

The next day, Friday saw me heading off in nasty sideways rain. Real rain. If you get straight down rainDSC05578 in Ireland it’s not considered real rain. Straight down rain brings the comment “it’s a grand soft day” instead of a hard day with proper sideways rain. Straight down rain is kind of summer rain, but don’t let that fool you because summer is a moveable feast in Ireland that doesn’t follow any real seasonal occurrences or dates. I rode up to the RDS in Ballsbridge, Dublin for the Carole Nash Motorbike and Scooter show and luckily found a nice sheltered place to get the bike out of the nasty weather. The show itself was excellent. The AMI & Overlanders, Touratech Stand was one of the highlights and their customised black Africa Twin was a sight to behold. It’s theirs for the year for tours and demo rides and I hope I am back fully fit in time to get a jaunt on it before it goes on a holiday abroad. I am not sure DSC05599how to give you an idea of the scale of this event because it was way bigger than I imagined it was going to be. All the major manufacturers of bikes and suppliers of clothing and protective gear as well as many other organisations were present. There were lots of exhibitions too, custom bikes, vintage bikes and the myriad prizes, cups and medals, as well as the leathers of a certain Mr. Joey Dunlop. A Northern Ireland motorcycle legend, Joey Dunlop was voted the second greatest motorcycle icon ever by Motorcycle News, and many would argue should be considered number one. DSC05666Some living legends were called to the stage in the Main Hall and gave interesting accounts of their racing experiences too. Of course there was food and drink stands and at times when the rain eased off a little it was possible to go outside and see the stunt riders performing their skills in a fenced off paddock. I imagine it is more usual to see four legged steeds being lead around there because the RDS is most famous for equestrian events. I could have stayed ogling the bike beauties for days. All the best adventure bikes from Honda, Yamaha and many more as well as fabulous cruisers from Indian and BMW. Ducati, Yamaha, Harley, Suzuki, Triumph, Husqavarna, Royal Enfield and many more were also showing their fabulous wares. As well as the beautiful vintage Indian in the featured image, the modern “behemoth” Indian Roadmaster was spectacular, but all the manufacturers did themselves proud. Kudos to Carole Nash for a fine spectacle. And that was only Friday with two more days to go in what had to have been a brilliant weekend for all the motorcycle enthusiasts who attended over the weekend.

I met Colin, an old school friend, also a big bike fan, and we nattered away for about an hour and then it was time to gear up and head back out into the heavy traffic and sideways rain. It was a rotten dark, wet evening heading down the M11 on Suzie but it was worth it.  Now lying convalescing in my sick bed (read: being spoiled rotten with beverages and tasty bits) I know I will again be suffering some withdrawal symptoms (http://wp.me/p7IHqF-ST) and worse than the last time, because this time I have a bike in the basement but am just not allowed to use it for a few weeks, or maybe a week, or maybe… We’ll see.

Happiness is a girl called…Suzuki.

Getting in some trips on the new V-Strom 1000. Laurie loves the comfort…

The new V-Strom exceeding expectations.

My wife Laurie was not a fan of the seat on my Yamaha Fazer. It was a reliable bike and brought me on some long trips and back, safely without and issues, breakdowns or fuss. dsc05573-2When I decided to change, Laurie’s comfort was one of the highest priorities, and the V-Strom Adventure I got from the guys in AMI (Adventure Motorcyles of Ireland) to test ride, came first in her rating. It got an immediate thumbs up with a special reference to how comfortable the seat was. So, we picked the Suzuki V-Strom up, all shiny and new, in Gorey Business Park in the first week of January. To say the least, she is loving it. I think the number of miles we covered on it together has probably already exceeded the number covered on the Fazer.

Last weekend we did some nice miles, heading to Duncannon beach in Wexford, in the dsc05574South East corner of Ireland. It’s a lovely beach with great views of the Hook Pennisula and the Waterford coastline. It’s one of Laurie’s favourites, having spent all her childhood summers there. Duncannon has some great pubs and restaurants and we hookstopped on the beach, which is firm enough to drive on. The “Ta-Dah” moment in the featured photo is when Laurie found a suitable piece of driftwood to put under the side-stand so we could park up for a little while. We headed for the Hook which is another of our favourite stops. Hook Lighthouse is one of the oldest working lighthouses in the world. After a visit to the Lighthouse restaurant we were off again. Waterford City and The Copper Coast was next on our agenda.

We got new Scott jackets and pants along with Schubert helmets that are very comfortable and we are very happy with them. I am particularly happy with the communication system because I can’t hear a word she says. Probably down to my bad hearing. Perfect.

seaview

Review of 2016 Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS Adventure.

Rider and Passenger’s viewpoint.

Whoever invented heated grips deserves a medal. My hands were cold when I got to the AMI (Adventure Motorcycles Ireland) Overlanders shop in the Business Park in Gorey, Wexford, Ireland. My own bike doesn’t have such luxuries and the mercury had been down at -2 Celsius (about 28 fahrenheit) when I was putting on the warmest gear to ride to Gorey to trial a demo bike. When I swung my leg over the bike that Gary had kindly provided me with I was delighted when I felt the warmth of the grips. Incidentally it was a guy called Jim Hollander that developed heated grips for bikes in 1976, which he used when he became the top American rider at the International Six Days Trial (now enduro: ISDE) . He developed the potential of his idea into a business at a later stage and the product is now widely used for bikes, ATVs and snowmobiles.

Gary had told me a few days before that there was a demonstration Suzuki V-Strom 1000 ABS Adventure available to test drive at the AMI shop. I had been looking forward to twisting the throttle on this bike since he told me about it. The first thing I noticed as I was pulling away was the instrument cluster. It’s big and clear in terms of the “clock” type rev counter and digital speed reading. It also gives you time, air temperature, engine temperature as well as clear indicator lights and information about the traction control and ABS. Directly under the instrument paneldsc05433 is a power outlet which is perfectly positioned for a GPS system. Another power outlet elsewhere on the bike for phones or other devices might be a useful addition, but if you needed one, they are usually not difficult to install. I did one on my bike in about half an hour. It takes a couple of minutes to find the right seating position on this bike but that is because the seat is big and comfy and so roomy you have to see what suits you best.  After a few minutes I was really comfortable and that lasted the couple of hours I had the bike out for. At the first stop I put my feet down and immediately realised that this is a tall machine. Apparently the seat is just over 33 inches (about 85 centimetres) high, it was almost tippy toe territory for me at about 5’11 inches. I don’t have a problem with being up on my toes but what I did worry about though, was that I felt that the pegs were sticking into my legs when I was stopped. I thought about this for a few minutes and at the next stop I tried something different. I have found before that if you stand up completely, your legs straighten out better and you get a better reach. Standing up at the stop on the V-Strom and consciously getting my legs behind the pegs, I could get my feet totally flat on the street. I realised that I could sit back down comfortably on the seat and my feet were still flat on the ground and the pegs weren’t interfering with my lower calves any more. So for me anyway it was just a matter of remembering to position my legs behind the pegs when I stopped. I got used to doing this in a matter of a few stops and had no difficulties after that.

The V-Strom is a great looking bike and while there is probably no need for the beaked front on adventure bikes, it does let you know immediately what the manufacturers intentions are. The wide handlebars and upright sitting position contribute to the great feeling of control and the 1037cc water cooled v-twin engine moves you along quietly img_7379and effortlessly. I am not going to attempt to tell you about the frame and the engine except to say it all works very well and by some magic the engineers at Suzuki have shaved 13% off the weight of the old V-Strom. It weighs in at 503lbs or 228kgs which is very acceptable and it is nice and narrow in the middle, even if the tank does seem very wide. The V-Strom feels smooth and planted and there is an extra sense of security on a bike with ABS and two stage traction control, especially on a frosty day like this day. The screen doesn’t appear that big, but it is easily adjustable on the fly, with a ratchet system, and it is quite effective, at least for someone of my height. I didn’t feel any buffeting at all, but the day was extremely calm. It might be different on a windy day. The adventure model I was test riding had side cases, heated grips, hand guards and engine bars where two spotlights are positioned as well as a cowl guard, rather than a bash plate. A bash plate is really only required on a bike where the intention is to take on serious off-roading, but this bike, I would suggest, is intended for touring and trail riding, rather than serious bashing about, though it is very light and agile, which is always a big help in the mucky stuff. And just to test it’s off-road qualities I drove across a field with a green cover crop (with the owner’s permission) with a soft enough surface to make the traction control and ABS lights come on a few times. No problems arose and the traction control wasn’t intrusive. I thought I’d have to turn it down a notch or even turn it off because the field was slippy enough after the heavy frost, but it was fine. Really for that kind of surface, knobblies would be necessary, but it was just curiosity to see how the electronic aids felt in action.

Anyone who has read an earlier article on Motorcycle Rambler, “Passenger’s Point of View”, which was a review of the Honda Africa Twin and the Yamaha Super Ten, will know that Mrs. Rambler is interested in the comfort levels available on any bike I test ride, for the obvious reason that she is in no doubt that one day, one of these demonstration rides will result in an increase or a change in the Rambler stable. So the instruction to take it home for close inspection had been issued. On the day in question, Mrs. Rambler and I were celebrating our 31st year since tying the proverbial knot and on that auspicious occasion we went for a spin on the V-Strom Adventure, to see what she made of it. It got an immediate thumbs up for comfort but there were two little queries. A small but noticeable degree of vibration when the throttle is opened wide and a slight issue with space between the pillion’s peg and the side case. The boots being worn weren’t the biggest boots she has ever worn on a bike spin and there was a worry that a bigger boot might make it difficult to get the heel to fit at the back of the peg. As for the vibration, I am happy to say that it is there when you push on strongly, but not noticeably more than what you would expect on any V-Twin.

So, in conclusion, this is a great bike for someone who wants a strong touring bike with some off-road potential. The saddle and sitting position are great for the rider and pillion passenger too. There should be no problem to comfortably cover a lot of miles in a day with the rider and a passenger and lots of luggage on board. A top box along with the cases that come with the adventure model would take a ton of stuff for longer tours. It has about 20 litres or 4.4 gallons (5.3 U.S.) of fuel capacity which should keep you rolling for 180 to 200 miles, if the fuel mileage that is attributed to the bike on various web-sites is accepted. I am not going to hazard any more of a precise guess as I didn’t test the fuel mileage myself. It’s a beautiful looking bike and the adventure model comes in a great matt and silver-grey livery (I don’t think there is any choice in the colour offered for the adventure bike). It’s light and nimble and seems fairly frugal on fuel. I covered about a hundred kilometres and the fuel gauge didn’t seem to move much. Another very interesting factor is the price. The base model is priced at 13, 950 euro and the Adventure model comes in at 14,950 with 500 euro cashback in 2017, I believe. In my opinion, this is a very well priced machine, particularly the Adventure option. It gives you a whole lot of bike with some important extras, for a great price. Thanks very much to the guys at AMI and particularly Gary for a great day on a fine example of an Adventure Bike I will be very happy to own.